George Rucker's Newsletter for November 15, 2016

The ancient pong game is here.  I created it by using a product from MIT called Scratch. To use Scratch go here.  You put the Scratch together by using action pieces like a jigsaw puzzle.  There are lots of tutorials on YouTube.  It was designed to give users the rudiments of programming.  Even kids can do it.  Just select the green flag to start the game of pong.  Use the green bar to prevent the ball hitting the bottom of the image (sidewalk).  Have Fun!  Walter

  Hola once again,


Well Trump won.  I can not wait to get my $5 from the Judge, I probably will save it in a frame.  By the time this letter is posted I will already have it.  That is why judges are honorable.


Note many are not talking about the fact that Trump won 306 electoral votes and to become president you need 270.  Hillary did not see any way she would not have 270.   Our forefathers put this system in place so major population centers could not steal an election.  It still is possible for only six states to name a president due to their high population.  Once these six states are in the bag for a particular party the other 44 states have basically no say in the Presidency.  They are California 55, Texas 38, New York 29 and Florida 29, Illinois 20 and Pennsylvania 20. You only need a few more to win. All votes are not verified but it looks like Clinton 232 and Trump 306.


Probably the next thing is Canada will build a wall to the south, many have said that they will leave the country.  I am sure they won’t want them either.  Some actually say they are leaving the planet, like Cher.  It looks like some high end furniture and homes will be on the market on the left coast.


What really troubles me the most is Colin Kaepernick, he will not stand for the National Anthem but did not take the time to vote.  Something tells me he does not care for anything except himself and face-time in the national news.


I can only guess why Clinton did not give a conciliatory speech.  My personal guess is that none was prepared and all the time spent on the acceptance speech was a total waste of time.  I finally listened to her speech and found it very good.


As usual the main stream media is not on the pulse of the American people.


From my military indoctrination starting at 17, if unhappy, “Suck it up Buttercup,” you will get over it.  The cottled generation of this nation has not been taught how to lose.


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Cinnamon roll apple pie


INGREDIENTS


5 Granny Smith apples

2 cans cinnamon rolls

½ cup sugar

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 tablespoon cornstarch


PREPARATION


1. Preheat oven to 350°F/180°C and spray a pie dish with nonstick oil.

2. Peel and cut the apples into thin slices and place in a bowl.

3. Add sugar, cinnamon, and cornstarch to apples and stir.

4. Cut each cinnamon roll in half and roll out with flour until thin.

5. Layer the bottom of the pie dish with the flattened cinnamon rolls to create a bottom crust.

6. Add the apples and layer the rest of the rolls on top to create a closed crust, pinching any holes together with your fingers.

7. Cover with foil and bake for 35 minutes.

8. Remove the foil and bake for another 10 minutes uncovered.

9. Allow the pie to cool and drizzle with icing.

10. Enjoy!


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38 Fiery Facts about Redheads


1.  Approximately 1-2% of humans, or about two in 100 people in the world, have red hair.

2.  The ancient Greeks believed that redheads would turn into vampires after they died.

3.  Otherwise dark hair may turn red or blond in cases of severe protein deficiency due to starvation.

4.  During the Middle Ages, a child with red hair was thought to be conceived during “unclean sex” or during menstruation.

5.  Red hair doesn’t gray as much as other hair colors. Red hair initially tends to turn blond and then white.

6.   According to Hamburg sex researcher Dr. Werner Habermehl, women with red hair have more sex than women with other hair colors. He also postulates that women in a relationship who dye their hair red may be signaling that they are unhappy and looking for something better.

7.  Because natural red hair holds its pigment more than other colors, it is harder to dye.

8.  Lilith, the supposed first wife of Adam, is said to have had red hair. She was ultimately kicked out of the Garden of Eden because she refused to be subordinate to Adam.

9.  Redheaded women report bruising more easily than other women of different hair colors.

10.  People with red hair have twice the risk of developing Parkinson’s Disease

11.  Because redheads have thicker hair than people with other hair colors, they have fewer strands of hair. For example, while blondes have on average 140,000 hairs, redheads have approximately 90,000.

12.  Hitler reportedly banned the marriage of redheads in order to prevent “deviant offspring.”

13.    During the witch hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Europe, many women were burned at the stake as witches merely because they had red hair.

14.  According to George Chapman’s 1613 play Bussy D’Ambois, the perfect poison must include the fat of a red-haired man.

15.  According to legend, the first redhead was Prince Idon of Mu who, upon discovering Atlantis, was imprinted with the island’s stunning red sunset and leaves in the form of red hair and freckles so future generations would be reminded of Atlantis’ first sunset.

16.  Red hair is a recessive trait, which means that a child must inherit one red hair gene from each parent. Recessive traits often come in pairs, and redheads are more likely than other people to be left handed.

17.  Some scholars speculate that because Adam was from “red earth” and the Hebrew word for “red” is adom, that Adam was a redhead.

18.  According to Playboy magazine, “Redheads are like other women—only more so.”

19.  Scholars note that redheads have influenced history out of proportion to their numbers. Famous redheads include Roman emperor Nero, Helen of Troy, Cleopatra, the ancient god of love Aphrodite, Queen Elizabeth I, Napoleon Bonaparte, Oliver Cromwell, Emily Dickinson, Antonio Vivaldi, Thomas Jefferson, Vincent Van Gogh, Mark Twain, James Joyce, Winston Churchill, Malcolm X, Galileo, and King David.

20.  The most rare hair color in humans is red.

21.  The sixteenth-century artist Titian (Tiziano Vecelli) painted so many redheads that his name became associated with a shade of red.

22.  In ancient Rome, redheaded slaves were often more expensive than those with other hair color.

23.  Satan is often portrayed as a redhead most likely because red was viewed as the color of sexual desire and moral degradation.

24.  In 1995, Professor Jonathan Reese discovered that mutations of the gene MC1R on chromosome 16 were responsible for red hair (known as the “ginger gene”). The gene mutation responsible for red hair in humans probably arose 20,000-40,000 years ago.

25.  While 49% of those polled in a Clairol Color Attitude survey think blonds are naive, only 15% thought redheads were.

26.  Some scholars postulate that the same gene mutation that causes red hair also affects the way redheads respond to pain and anesthetics.[1]

Mark Twain once quipped that “while the rest of the human race are descended from monkeys, redheads derive from cats.”

27.  In Egypt, redheads were buried alive as sacrifices to the god Osiris.

28.  According to a Clairol Color Attitude survey, 71% of redheads think that the word “bold” describes them, which is 24 points ahead of blonds.

29.  Scientists now report that Neanderthals had a version of the gene that causes red hair but not the same variant as in modern humans, suggesting they did not interbreed with each other.

30.  There is a common perception that redheads could become extinct in 100 years. However, a National Geographic article states that while redheads may decline, barring a catastrophe, the gene for red hair will not likely become extinct.

31.  While Scotland has the highest proportion (13%) of redheads (followed by Ireland with 10%), the United States has the largest population of redheads in the world, with between 6-18 million redheads, or 2-6% of the population.

32.  Red hair is a mutation of the MC1R gene on chromosome 16. The mutation blocks the production of eumelanin (dark brown and black pigment), which causes a buildup of the phaeomelanin (red and blond pigments). Some scientists believe that higher levels of phaeomelanin may produce more mutations and dangerous effects when exposed to UV radiation.

33.  The gene that causes red hair initially had the benefit of increasing the body’s ability to make vitamin D, which was important for people living farther away from the equator. However, today’s redheads are more likely to develop skin cancer and premature wrinkles.

34.  “Ginger phobia” is a fear of redheads. “Gingerism” is the bullying or prejudice of redheads.

35.  In Michelangelo’s Temptation and in St. Paul's Cathedral, Eve is initially depicted as having brown and blond hair, respectively. But in both artistic renditions, after she eats the apple and she and Adam are driven from the Garden of Eden, Eve is depicted as a redhead.

36.  Ruadh gu brath is Gaelic for “Red heads forever!”

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37.  Some common surnames in the British Isles reflect the frequency of red hair there, including Flanary (“red eyebrow”), Reid (“red-haired, ruddy complexion”), and Flynn (“bright red”).


References for the above if any wish to read more on this subject.,


1 Blue, Laura. “Do Red Heads Really Feel More Pain? The Jury’s Still Out.”


2 Cass, Cort. The Red Head Handbook. Blue Mountain Arts, Inc,


3 Douglas, Stephen. The Redhead Encyclopedia. Redheads International/Stone Castle Literary Group,


4 Gao, Xiang, Kelly C. Simon, et al. “Genetic Determinants of Hair Color and Parkinson’s Disease.” Ann Neurol.


5 Garreau, Joel. “Red Alert!” The Washington Post. March 19, 2002.


6 Liem, Edwin B, Sandra Hollensead, et al. “Women with Red Hair Report a Slightly Increase Rate of Bruising but Have Normal Coagulation Tests.” Anesthesia and Analgesia.


7 “Redheads Have More Sex Than Brunettes or Blonds.” MailOnline.


8 Rincon, Paul. “Neanderthals ‘Were Flame-Haired.’” BBC News.


9 Roach, Marion. The Roots of Desire: The Myth, Meaning, and Sexual Power of Red Hair. Bloomsbury USA,


10 Sherrow, Victoria. Encyclopedia of Hair: A Cultural History. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group,


11 Sterling, Kristin. Red Everywhere. Lerner Publications,


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At my age, 75, many of the inventions I write about I have used.  The next one I used in school, received as a toy, and given as a toy to grandchildren.


The microscope provides a portal through which we can view things unseen by the naked eye.  Like many great inventions, microscopes have evolved over time, from a simple hand lens used by Romans in the first century to modern magnifying devices of today.


The compound microscope, invented by Anton van Leeuwenhoek in the 1900s, was the first big advancement in the pursuit of magnification.  The new technology allowed van Leeuwenhoek to make many biological discoveries, including the first sight of bacteria, the details inside a drop of water and the circulation of blood in capillaries.


The compound microscopes contains an eyepiece (with a lens that magnifies to a power of 10 or 15 times) that the user looks through to examine a specimen; objective lenses (which further magnify up to 100 times); an aperture that allows light from an illuminator to reach the specimen; and illumination, usually in the form of a low-wattage bulb.  A stage or shelf hold the specimen, and adjustment knobs enable the user to bring the object into focus.  Once a specimen is fixed on a slide to the stage, light passes the aperture through the slide and objective lens and continues through the body of the instrument up to the eyepiece.  This invention significantly advanced the field of biology, but its impact was limited by the size of light’s wavelength and dependability of the light source.


In 1933, German engineer Ernst Ruska conquered these problems with the development of an electron microscope, revolutionizing the field of science.  Instead of a light source, a beam of electrons passes though the slide, allowing greater resolution and a more detailed view of a specimen.  Electrons that hit the specimen scatter in many directions, while electrons that pass straight on through are captured on the screen below.  The discovery earned Ruska a Nobel Prize and transformed our understanding of cell structure and molecular parts that make up our world.


Electron microscopes are and integral part of many laboratories.  There are two types:  the transmission electron microscope, which utilizes a camera to send an image to a video monitor (resulting in a very high resolution), and the scanning electron microscope, which focuses on a very small part of the sample and enables superior 3-D images.


These microscopes allow scientists to examine microorganisms, molecules, biopsy samples, crystalline structures and various other surfaces.  The technology is also used to produce computer parts, examine evidence found at crime scenes and search for stress lines in an engine, assisting in a wide range of disciplines and industries.  Modern electron microscopes are able to magnify objects as much as 300,000 times providing detailed images of Life’s greatest mysteries.


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I am not sure what to write about, I am thinking a little about the transition of a government going from liberalism to conservative.  The problem is some would say I would be gloating.  There are many web-sites out there on the subject, however one takes on the subject very well.  It includes job applications, a suggestion box, and information on how to best serve America.  Www.greatagain.gov


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A friend of mine tried to annoy me with bird puns, but I soon realized that


toucan play at that game.


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You can’t run through a campground.  You can only ran,


Because it’s past tents.


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Lately I find more recipes posted on FaceBook than received in my e-mail.  I find them easy to manage also in a folder called “Recipes”


It now has sub-folders called: meat, soup, desert, veggies, crockpot, web-sites, and dips.  I am sure it will grow with other folders as I have about six more I found interest to file when I get a chance.


This is for a small family.


Here is one that also has a video,  http://www.chelseasmessyapron.com/crockpot-turkey-breast-video/


The most tender and deliciously seasoned crockpot turkey breast. Perfect for smaller holiday get together or to have turkey ready for lunches and salads during the week.


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This is the turkey recipe if you want something low maintenance (like seriously very little work), easy to do, one dish to clean up, and just about zero percent chance of a dried out turkey. Dried out turkey is always a huge concern for many people when cooking turkey in the oven. It’s easy to over-cook it! But in a slow cooker? Nope. It comes out super moist (<–raise your hand if you hate that word! ??), delicious, and flavorful. Literally it falls off the bones it’s so super tender.

Now, you won’t get that super pretty crisp skin by cooking a turkey in the crockpot and you can’t fit super huge turkeys in the crockpot, but it is great for a smaller get together or if you aren’t huge turkey fans and plan on doing a ham or other meats. It also makes some of the best turkey for sandwiches and salads as it shreds super well. The past few years the husband and I have always cooked a turkey in the oven and been very traditional about the whole thing, but after one taste of this turkey we are never going back. Crockpot OR bust!


A few quick “turkey” notes. Be sure that your turkey is 100% thawed out before putting it in the crockpot. This does take some planning and preparation as a turkey will generally need to sit in the fridge for 1-2 days (a 5-7 pound turkey) to get fully thawed out.


I highly recommend a bone-in turkey breast just because of the flavor you’ll get from it. And speaking of flavor, why do I remove the skin?? Well, it’s totally personal preference. You can leave the skin on (and many people swear by the flavor the skin on a turkey brings to the meat). However, after making 2 crockpot turkeys (one skin on, one skin off), I preferred the one with the skin removed before cooking.


Either way, you’ll likely want to remove the skin as it doesn’t get that nice crisp that an oven will get. It’s just a matter of removing it before or after cooking. You can get a great flavor by leaving it on and removing it after cooking, but I prefer the spices on the actual meat. Which, technically, you can rub the spices on AND under the skin. I just think it gets on better without the skin and the melted butter really enhances the spices/flavor of the actual meat instead of skin you’ll be removing. So really, there are pros and cons to either. Whatever you like to do — skin on or off! I’m no turkey cooking pro, I just like yummy tender turkey that’s easy to make ??


Ingredients


    1 bone-in turkey breast (5-6 pounds), completely thawed

    5 stalks celery

    2 yellow onions

    About a cup (~12-15) baby carrots

    1 cup chicken broth

    6 tablespoons butter, separated


Seasonings


    1 tablespoon dried minced garlic

    1 teaspoon seasoned salt

    1 teaspoon paprika

    ½ teaspoon pepper

    1 teaspoon Italian seasoning

    1/4 teaspoon dried parsley

    1/4 teaspoon dried sage

    Optional: 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme*



Instructions


    Make sure the turkey breast is completely thawed -- this can take 1-2 days in the fridge so be prepared. It isn't food safe to thaw a turkey in the crockpot.

    Spray a large crockpot (I use a 6 quart crockpot) with nonstick spray.

    Place the celery at the bottom. Cut one yellow onion into large chunks and add it to the bottom. Add the baby carrots. Pour the chicken broth on top.

    Cut off the skin of the turkey breast (OR leave it on, whatever you prefer -- see last paragraph of blog post for more notes on this)

    Place the turkey breast, BREAST DOWN on top of the vegetables.

    Cut the other onion in half and place inside the turkey with 4 tablespoons butter.

    Stir together all of the seasonings and rub all over the turkey. If leaving the skin on, make sure to rub the seasonings under the skin.

    Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter and, using a pastry brush, brush it all over the turkey.

    Cover the crockpot and cook on high for 1 hour and then low for 5-7 hours or until the turkey's internal temperature reaches 165 degrees F and it is very tender.

    Remove the turkey from the crockpot and turn so it is breast up.

    Start by removing the wishbone and then remove all the other bones. Take the large pieces of meat and slice them.

    Enjoy.


Notes

TO MAKE GRAVY: Remove the vegetables and strain out the remaining liquid in the slow cooker. Add that liquid to a small pot and allow to sit for 5-10 minutes or until all the fat comes to the surface. Remove the fat and allow the mixture to come to a simmer over medium-low heat. Stir constantly for about 5-10 minutes or until thickened. In a separate bowl, briskly whisk together 1 and ½ tablespoons cornstarch with 2 tablespoons cold water until completely smooth. Briskly whisk that mixture into the gravy and simmer over low heat until completely thickened. Add salt, pepper, and any other seasonings needed.


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Now, you won’t get that super pretty crisp skin by cooking a turkey in the crockpot and you can’t fit super huge turkeys in the crockpot, but it is great for a smaller get together or if you aren’t huge turkey fans and plan on doing a ham or other meats. It also makes some of the best turkey for sandwiches and salads as it shreds super well. The past few years the husband and I have always cooked a turkey in the oven and been very traditional about the whole thing, but after one taste of this turkey we are never going back. Crockpot OR bust!


A few quick “turkey” notes. Be sure that your turkey is 100% thawed out before putting it in the crockpot. This does take some planning and preparation as a turkey will generally need to sit in the fridge for 1-2 days (a 5-7 pound turkey) to get fully thawed out.


I highly recommend a bone-in turkey breast just because of the flavor you’ll get from it. And speaking of flavor, why do I remove the skin?? Well, it’s totally personal preference. You can leave the skin on (and many people swear by the flavor the skin on a turkey brings to the meat). However, after making 2 crockpot turkeys (one skin on, one skin off), I preferred the one with the skin removed before cooking.


Either way, you’ll likely want to remove the skin as it doesn’t get that nice crisp that an oven will get. It’s just a matter of removing it before or after cooking. You can get a great flavor by leaving it on and removing it after cooking, but I prefer the spices on the actual meat. Which, technically, you can rub the spices on AND under the skin. I just think it gets on better without the skin and the melted butter really enhances the spices/flavor of the actual meat instead of skin you’ll be removing. So really, there are pros and cons to either. Whatever you like to do — skin on or off! I’m no turkey cooking pro, I just like yummy tender turkey that’s easy to make ??


Ingredients


    1 bone-in turkey breast (5-6 pounds), completely thawed

    5 stalks celery

    2 yellow onions

    About a cup (~12-15) baby carrots

    1 cup chicken broth

    6 tablespoons butter, separated


Seasonings


    1 tablespoon dried minced garlic

    1 teaspoon seasoned salt

    1 teaspoon paprika

    ½ teaspoon pepper

    1 teaspoon Italian seasoning

    1/4 teaspoon dried parsley

    1/4 teaspoon dried sage

    Optional: 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme*



Instructions


    Make sure the turkey breast is completely thawed -- this can take 1-2 days in the fridge so be prepared. It isn't food safe to thaw a turkey in the crockpot.

    Spray a large crockpot (I use a 6 quart crockpot) with nonstick spray.

    Place the celery at the bottom. Cut one yellow onion into large chunks and add it to the bottom. Add the baby carrots. Pour the chicken broth on top.

    Cut off the skin of the turkey breast (OR leave it on, whatever you prefer -- see last paragraph of blog post for more notes on this)

    Place the turkey breast, BREAST DOWN on top of the vegetables.

    Cut the other onion in half and place inside the turkey with 4 tablespoons butter.

    Stir together all of the seasonings and rub all over the turkey. If leaving the skin on, make sure to rub the seasonings under the skin.

    Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter and, using a pastry brush, brush it all over the turkey.

    Cover the crockpot and cook on high for 1 hour and then low for 5-7 hours or until the turkey's internal temperature reaches 165 degrees F and it is very tender.

    Remove the turkey from the crockpot and turn so it is breast up.

    Start by removing the wishbone and then remove all the other bones. Take the large pieces of meat and slice them.

    Enjoy.


Notes

TO MAKE GRAVY: Remove the vegetables and strain out the remaining liquid in the slow cooker. Add that liquid to a small pot and allow to sit for 5-10 minutes or until all the fat comes to the surface. Remove the fat and allow the mixture to come to a simmer over medium-low heat. Stir constantly for about 5-10 minutes or until thickened. In a separate bowl, briskly whisk together 1 and ½ tablespoons cornstarch with 2 tablespoons cold water until completely smooth. Briskly whisk that mixture into the gravy and simmer over low heat until completely thickened. Add salt, pepper, and any other seasonings needed.


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For my in-laws cruising the Carribean, I have taped the Garth Brooks concert on my DVR.  We can watch it together upon your return.  I am hoping the kitchen will be finished by then.  If not completed the viewing will be delayed.  Enjoy the music of the Carribean, I always liked it.

Speaking of concerts on DVD, I have probably 35 or so, some of these concerts are no longer available to attend live as the feature artist as passed on, like Bob Marley, Jimmi Hendrix, The Doors etc.  We do not need Jimmy Buffet to have a tail gate party as I have three of his concerts, plus one of his big blenders.  A great concert to watch is Shania Twain live in Chicago.  Speaking of Shania Twain where is she now, I need to check.

Shania Twain, OC is a Canadian singer and songwriter. With nearly 25 years in the music industry, Twain has sold over 85 million records, making her the best-selling female artist in the history of country music and one of the best-selling artists of all time. Her success garnered her several honorific titles including the "Queen of Country Pop".

I see she has some past tour DVDs for sale, but no tour planned for 2017.  Perhaps she is going to stay in Las Vegas name of her last tour.

If you have a DVD player and would like to borrow one I have, just ask.

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See some of you at exercise.  Have a great day and smile.


George



For a weekly copy put letter in subject line and e-mail grucker@capecod.net

Some older letters are posted on www.capecod-beaches.com but note my friend Walter will sometimes add stuff to my letter as he is as far left as I am right.

Do you like rice served in a Mexican restaurant?  I is easy to make without using any of the boxed mixes.

Mexican style rice.

Ingredients

1 cup rice, white, basmati and jasmine work great
2 cups Progresso chicken broth
1 10oz can Old El Paso enchilada sauce
salt and pepper to taste


Directions

In a large skillet or saucepan add the rice, Progresso chicken broth and Old El Paso enchilada sauce. Bring to a boil over medium high heat, stir well, cover the pot, then turn down the heat to a medium.

Cook for about 10 to 15 minutes, or until the rice is completely cooked, stirring occasionally.

Season with salt and pepper.

Top with tomatoes, green onions and cilantro or whatever else you prefer before serving.

I could personally just have rice, or rice and beans for lunch or dinner. I know not everyone feels that way though. This rice works as a filler for burritos as well. You’ll find that it’s simple to remember, too; which allows you to just whip it up whenever as the perfect side. This rice goes so perfectly with pretty much anything that you don’t have to pay too much attention to your main dish.

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